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Lydia Cruttwell's blog

Aging, Dementia, and the Church

"Dementia has replaced cancer as the most feared word in our society. If we live to be 85, 50% of us will have it."

This coming Saturday and Sunday, we are pleased to be hosting Ingrid Schultz (chaplain to the Alzheimer's ward at Menno Home in Abbostford, and former pastor here at FUMC) for a series of seminars on Dementia and the church.

Saturday Nov. 16th:
2-3pm: Spiritual Needs of Elders
3:30 pm - 4:30pm: Connect don't Correct: how to communicate with someone with dementia

5-6pm -- a soup-and-bun dinner (by donation)

6-8:30pm: "Away from Her" (film) and discussion

Sunday November 17th:
during the Sunday Service Ingrid will be speaking from Lam. 3:19-27 on
"Exile and Hope: Dementia in the Faith Community"

If you would like to join us for any or all of the Saturday sessions, please RSVP to Grace Epp (604-940-3368, or gepp@dccnet.com)

To Remember is to Work for Peace

It's almost November 11th -- Armistice Day, or Remembrance Day. It was the day when hostilities formally ceased between Germany and the Allies in 1918, marking the end of World War I. It is a day which marks the end of the Great War, which visited so much horror upon Europe.

...and yet, the armistice signed that day (and the later Treaty of Versailles, which was signed in June of 1919) laid the seed-bed for the next Great War -- World War II. The conditions of surrender for Germany were so harsh that they plunged the country into a depression (both economic and societal) that left them, in the 1930's, very willing to follow a charismatic leader who proposed to re-start their economy and reinvigorate their national pride. A leader named Adolf Hitler.

Sometimes, 'peace treaties' only ensure further war in later years. Sometimes, 'the war to end all wars' only creates a new generation of those who solve their problems with guns and tanks. Sometimes, we remember those who were willing to die in a far-off country as heroes without stopping to consider how we might make sure no one else need die in that way again.

We worship a Saviour who said "You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor[a] and hate your enemy.’ But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be children of your Father in heaven." (Mt. 5:43-44). We worship a Saviour who refused -- in spite of the expectations of those all around him -- to lead an armed rebellion, who told his disciples to put up their swords. We worship a Saviour who chose to die rather than to kill, and who calls us to take up our own cross and follow him.

The Chiasm ends, but the Revealing continues!

With last week's sermon on Revelation 12 (see the 'sermons' tab above for the recording), our great experiement in reading Revelation chiastically comes to an end! However, this doesn't mean that we're done exploring Revelation -- this Sunday (November 10th) we're pleased to have John and Betty Heinrichs speaking to us about pacifism in the Revelation of Jesus Christ, and two Sundays from now we'll be incorporating Revelation into our Eternity Sunday service.

... and then, after a two month break (for Advent, Christmas, and then a pulpit exchange with other local Mennonite Churches), we'll return to Revelation for five Sundays in February 2014! So continue reading and praying through this last book of the bible -- and if you've got any particular topics or passages that you'd like us to cover in February, feel free to talk to Greg or Lydia!

Sermons!

Just in case you haven't moseyed on over to the 'Sermons tab' (up top in the black bar) lately, you should -- we're all up to date on sermons for our Revelation series, and you don't want to miss out on all the uncovering, revealing, and apokalysis-ing going on in these messages!

A Petition for Peace

The Mennonite Central Committee is calling on all of us to sign a petition in support of Ricardo Esquivia, the found of Sembrandopaz ('Sewing Peace'), an MCC Partner. For those of you who were in church this Sunday, this is the person whom our new attender Shalom talked about, since she knows him personally and is very concerned about the situation in Colombia.

Below is a summary of the situation (from the petition site, moveon.org):

According to credible sources, Ricardo Esquivia faces the threat of detention by the Colombian authorities. Ricardo and Sembrandopaz work with conflict-affected communities of the Caribbean Coast in Colombia to peacefully reconcile differences and build a better future.

Ricardo Esquivia has been a driver of peace and community development in the region for over 40 years, as evidenced by international peace awards from the Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. He is Co-founder and Director of the Commission for Restoration, Life and Peace of the Evangelical Council of Churches of Colombia (CEDECOL). He is also the founder and former Director of Justapaz, the Christian Center for Justice, Peace and Nonviol ent Action of the Mennonite Church of Colombia. For many years he represented all non-Catholic religious groups on the National Council of Peace, which advises the President of Colombia. Despite his record (or perhaps because of it), Ricardo has been repeatedly threatened with detention or legal action. It is time to end this harassment of a proven servant of the Colombian people.

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